Archive

Archive for the ‘HOSPITALITY’ Category

HAIKU 5*7*5* Walk home

September 7, 2017 1 comment

Just don’t have a car

Fifty seven hundred shifts

Walk home from the bar

Advertisements

2:30 A.M. MBTA Service: An idea whose time has come again.

June 27, 2017 1 comment

I propose restoring Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) late night service(LNS) until 2:30 A.M. on Friday, Saturday and the evenings before legal holidays.

  From March of 2014 until March of 2016 the MBTA offered LNS carrying 16,000 riders nightly for its first year before declining to 13,000 riders by February, 2016 (1)

  I propose doubling the late-night subway and grade level train fare to $4.20 from the $2.10 charged on stored value cards.  (Paying by the trip is $2.40)

  This would defray some of the cost of LNS and enable the return of this economically justifiable, convenient and safe means of travel.

  Casual phrases such as ‘world class city’ are often bandied about when Boston is spoken of.  Yet, the last outbound trains from Park St run at 12:54 A.M.

  The benefits of restoring LNS MBTA service would be numerous.

  Hospital and hotel workers work a variety of shifts.  As Boston proper has gentrified many of these working folks cannot afford to live within walking distance of their jobs.

  Furthermore even as taxis have been supplemented by Uber, Lyft and a variety of car services transportation expenses can be a significant part of a working person’s take-home income.

  Even at the UberPool-Boston rate of $6-8, (2), from Massachusetts General Hospital to Harvard and Comm. Ave(s) in Allston this prorates to about $660, $6 x 110 weekend trips=$660 annually for a late-night employee working weekends at $12/hr.  This amounts to about a week’s take-home pay.  Considering the large number of hospital and hotel staff working after 1 A.M. this has a considerable effect upon workers and employers.

Have mercy!

 LNS service would benefit already existing retail outlets.  24 hour super markets such as Star Market at 53 Huntington Ave. and the Star market at 33 Kilmaronock St. would gain a clientele for whom late night grocery shopping is a practical necessity and more economical than a convenience store.

  The LNS which ended in March of 2016 was not the first foray of the MBTA into extended hours.  From 2001 until 2005 the Night Owl service offered bus service until 2:30 A.M.  However, the scattered stops and slow speed worked against the service’s popularity and the Night Owl was attracting a mere 600 riders on Friday, Saturday and nights before legal holidays before being cancelled in 2005.

  The LNS initiated in March of 2014 and cancelled March 18, 2016 carried 16,000 riders by train nightly for its first year before declining to 13,000 riders nightly by February, 2016.

 The cancellation decision was made by a 4-0 unanimous decision of the MBTA Fiscal and Management Control Board on January 25, 2016.  (1)

  Leaving aside the question(s) of whether applying and norming the subsidy cost(s) through the entire day(s) would be a valid statistical method, the MBTA nonetheless claims the net marginal cost of LNS is $14 million annually based on a fare of $2.10 per rider.

  My proposal is to increase the LNS fare to $4.20 and thus halve the net marginal cost.

  Assuming ridership remains the same, and I do know what they say about assume, the net marginal cost would sink to $7 million annually!

  What the MBTA has not acknowledged is that the increased business enabled by the LNS would create taxable income some of which could be earmarked towards reducing the MBTA’s chronic operating deficit.

  Boston is a challenging city to drive in even under optimal conditions.  Dark winter nights make this intrinsic challenge even more treacherous as snow and ice pile up.  This challenge is compounded exponentially when large numbers of folks exiting bars and clubs congregate on the sidewalks and streets.

  From 1993 to 1999 I worked at a variety of venues in the Theater District and witnessed departing guests hanging around the area until 3:30 A.M. while socializing, eating snacks and attempting to hail taxis.  The crowds milling about caused significant litter problems, interrupted traffic and ultimately endangered the safety of those hanging around.

  My current employer takes the provisions of MA Dram Shop Liability as established in 1983, (2), very seriously.

  However, even the best managed established establishments are not immune from “pre-gaming” and drug use by guests that leads to slow exits, littering and dangerous and endangered crowds after closing.

  During the lifespan of LNS from 2014 until its cancellation in 2016 my employer did not have this problem as the last Green Line from Kenmore Square departed outbound at 2;30 A.M. allowing sufficient time for the fifteen-minute walk from my employer to the Kenmore Square MBTA station. 

Management mentioned, on more than 1 occasion, that folks tended to leave in order to catch the last train.

  On February 17, 2017 I asked my Assistant Manager, A.M; about my proposal to restore LNS MBTA by charging a double fare.

S.G: So how has the discontinuation of late-night service affected us?

C.M: It has discouraged travel from our customers in Allston as they can’t afford a cab or even Uber or Lyft.  They would have to leave with folks that they don’t know and a lot of our people just won’t do that.

S.G: What do you think that comes to in dollars?

A.M: About 5-10%.  It’s not nothing over the course of a year.  When did it end anyway?

S.G: March 18th. of last year.

A.M: Close to a year, huh.  You know another thing is that there isn’t the parking around here that there was even a year ago and when the Sox start up again it’s like [the parking] at least $30 and that is tough for kids even though most of them don’t have cars.  We don’t really get the trusties, [students who are completely supported by their parents and have leased cars through the school year], our kids are just looking for a good time.

S.G: Do you think our crowd would pay for a double fare after 12:30 on Friday, Saturday and nights before legal holidays?

A.M:  That would be $4.20, right?

S.G: Yes.

A.M: I would [use the LNS service] if I were in school and lived in Allston.  You would keep the service running until a last departure from Kenmore at 2:30 like before?

S.G: Yes.

A.M: I think that it’s a good idea and would keep some drunks off the road.

  On Saturday, March 11, 2017 I decided to investigate my manager’s assertion regarding the slow departure of guests now that LNS was no longer available.  I left my security post with the permission of my supervisor at 1:45 A.M. as last call was being given.  I observed a dozen guests in front of the building which was surprising considering the 15 F weather.  After clearing the building at 2:30 A.M. I returned to the entrance of the building and found 30 folks smoking, eating pizza and looking for a hook-up.  Folks wandered into the active traffic flow attempting to flag the passenger filled cabs that veered to avoid hitting the remaining revelers.

  Smartphones were frantically employed as folks tried to reach Uber and Lyft but evidently the cold had prevailed over economic opportunity.

  At 2:45 A.M. I left work and there were still 6 guests eating pizza and smoking by the front of the building while discarding the crusts and butts on the sidewalk.

  This scene would not have occurred were the LNS still running.

  “Better safe than sorry,” is more than a cliche’, it is a sound operating principle which would be activated by the renewal of LNS even at double the fare.

  Additionally, lessened consumption of fossil fuel by drivers would have positive environmental effects.

  Enabling employment and entertainment, preserving public safety and environmental sustainability, MBTA LNS at a double fare is an idea whose time has come…again!

ALL ABOARD!

WORKS CITED

1) uberPOOL…Share the ride, split the cost.  Page 1, Web, 6 March, 2017

https://get.uber.com/p/uberpool-Boston

2) Dungca, Nicole.  “MBTA to end late-night service by mid-March.”  Boston Globe, 29 Feb, 2016.  Web. 3 March, 2017

https;//ww.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/02/…late-night-service-end-march…/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BARTENDING, REMIXOLOGY, DRINK, HOSPITALITY: Kentucky Colonel cocktail

July 13, 2016 1 comment

KENTUCKY COLONEL

Bourbon is Kentucky’s spirit and indeed the truest American spirit ie: hard liquor.

Bourbon is a barrel-aged distilled spirit made from fermented corn.  “Bourbon” derives its name from Bourbon County Kentucky, the eastern edge of French territory in the United States prior to the Louisiana Purchase in 1803.

Bourbon can come only from Kentucky.  Jack Daniels, as every bartender should know, comes from Lynchburg Tennessee, and is a sour mash whiskey.

What true bourbons such as Jim Beam and Maker’s Mark, have in common with Jack Daniels is that both are made utilizing the sour mash method.  In the sour mash method some of the cooked fermented corn, the “mash”, is used as a base for the next batch in order to pass along the yeast and flavor in a consistent fashion.  This process is analogous to the making of yogurt.

I began tending bar in 1982 and the bottles of Wild Turkey and Old Grand Dad stocked by my employer had perhaps 1 or 2 tipplers who drained them in an exceedingly slow fashion often mixed with Coke.  “Old man drink” is the phrase that comes to mind.  Bartenders then casually referred to Jack Daniels as a “bourbon.”  Few knew otherwise…and even fewer cared.

Bourbon’s public profile was limited to the annual TV gala of the Kentucky Derby where Southern gentlemen in straw boaters cavorted with Southern belles in oversized bonnets hoisting flutes of Mint Juleps.

During the ’90s bourbon advanced as Gen X, born from 1967-1975, aged out of dance clubs and into the lounges that proliferated towards the end of that decade.  During the ’90s back lit bottles of Evan Williams and Maker’s mark became familiar sights at Stephanie’s on Newbury and City Bar at the Lenox Hotel here in Boston.

Still bourbon did not have anywhere near the cachet’ of Irish whisky, let alone Scotch or cognac.  Appeal was limited to the United States.

2016 has bourbon increasing in sales AND quality AND international appeal as premium and small batch bourbons have joined Scotch and cognac in the contest for the taste buds and wallets of imbibers.

 In 2014 Japanese mega beverage corporation Suntory acquired Jim Beam for the astonishing price of 1.6 billion USDs!

In 1999 there were 455,000 cases of bourbon produced.  In 2015 there were 5 million cases produced with about 1/2 of that being exported.

Small batch and single-barrel offerings such as Woodford, Bulleit and Knob Creek, produced by Jim Beam, have earned slots on back bars and in the gullets of drinkers.

www.bourbonoftheday.com/bourbon-boom/

In that spirit I will introduce the Kentucky Colonel which was passed on to me by a brother bartender during last year’s Kentucky Derby.

KENTUCKY COLONEL

1 .5 oz. bourbon

1 1/2 lime

3 oz. ginger beer

  1. Fill a 10 oz, glass with ice.

  2. Pour 1.5 ounces bourbon.

  3. Press the juice of 1/2 of a ripe lime.  The lime should be verging on yellow as this indicates ripeness and optimal juiciness.  Roll the lime firmly on a hard surface to break down the juice-containing segments to achieve optimal yield.

  4. Top with ginger beer.

  5. “Box” the drink into an empty glass and return to the original glass to insure a fluid mix of the ingredients.

  6. Garnish with a lime wheel perched on the rim.

  7. Drink up!

The flavor profile of the Kentucky Colonel is one that engages the tongue with the burn of bourbon, the citrusy acidity of the lime and the almost sweet effervescence of ginger beer.

One could make this with Rose’s Lime juice imitating the fresh lime and root beer performing the ginger beer part but this would lessen the thirst quenching action of the KENTUCKY COLONEL and you’re better than that, aren’t you?

My encounter with this concoction inspired a fantasy of being a winner of a NASCAR race and I don’t even drive!

My current employer would price this at $8 as Jim Beam is $7 with a $1 added for the ginger beer.

Old school, try Googling ‘Kentucky Colonel’, and tres chic in our Digital Decade at one and the same time the KENTUCKY COLONEL is a winner!

 

 

 

BARTENDER’S TIPS #1) Towels

September 15, 2014 Leave a comment

Towels are an important and often overlooked tool in the bartender’s toolbox.

Bars accumulate a variety of detritus,  Water, liquor, beer, wine, juice, soda and shredded beverage napkins coalesce to form a swamp that requires constant excavation.

Bar towels are the tool that enables you to clean and most importantly, earn.

(Upon arrival at work grab 4 towels.  (If towels are not provided for you buy cheap dish towels at at Dollar General or CVS.

You can thank me later).

Towel #1 should be moistened and placed close to your register.  Use this towel to wet your fingers so as to expedite removing cash from the till.  Do NOT lick your hand to accomplish this.  Money is filthy as anyone who has worked in retail can testify.  It is a risk to your health and the health of your guests to distribute saliva.

Additionally, some guests, and I am among them, will not tip a bartender for saliva soaked bills.

Just keep the towel wet and touch it lightly upon placing and/or removing cash from the box.

Towel #2 should be hooked around your belt in the rear as a “tail”.  This will enable you to keep your hands dry, clean and warm.  Ice and liquid can cause your hand to involuntarily contract.  When your hand opens it will tremor involuntarily, creating a perception of nervousness.

This perception can only cost you gratuity earnings.

The 3rd. towel should  be moistened with club soda and be within arm’s reach under the bar.  Use one of the “fluffy” towels for this function as this towel will be the one that is used to wipe down the bar.  Every guest should have their arrival greeted by a cleansing of their space regardless of whether it is needed or not.

The diligent performance of unneeded work is one of the most important aspects of tending bar.

Yes, club soda scours away sugar deposits.  When you are closing have all of the bar towels soaked with club soda so as to leave a sugar-free bar surface.

Finally, your 4th. towel should be a “flat” towel to be used for drying the bar of any spillage and removing any of the moisture left by cleaning the bar with towel #3.

Cheers!

 

 

 

REMIXOLOGY, DRINK, HOSPITALITY, BARTENDING: The Funkmaster Flex

The Funkmaster Flex martini is the foster child of the Dr. Funk cocktail.

DR. FUNK

2 1/2 Oz. Myer’s Jamican rum

1/4 oz. Pernod anise liquer

1/2 oz. lemon juice

1/4 oz. grenadine

1/4 oz. sugar

1 lime

Club soda

The Dr. Funk is made with crushed ice in a shaker.  The lime is cut in half, squeezed and the shells and sugar are added.  Shake well and pour all ingredients into a Tiki glass and top with club soda.

http://www.drinksmixer.com/drink7686.html

The Dr. Funk is an early 60’s Tiki bar favorite.  The Boston of the late 70s boasted the Kon-Tiki, named after the Thor Heyerdahl’s non-fiction book KON TIKI which chronicled the tale of floating from Fiji to America by raft, located in the Sheraton Boston slot now occupied by the SideBar.

Comm. Ave.’s Somerset building featured Aku-Aku’s “Polynesian” food and cocktails.  Both food and drink featured lots of sugar, copious amounts of Red Dye #2 and paper umbrellas.

The 80s brought the demise of these establishments leaving the Harvard Square and Fanueil Hall Hong Kongs’ to carry the flag of Dr. Funk.

As it does so often cocktail culture began strip mining the past in the 21st. Century as Lansdowne St.’s Tiki Bar and Kingston St’s, Peeping Duck brought a revival of faux Cantonese food and Tiki Bar drinks.

During my brief but educational tim at the Harvard Square Hong Kong we served the Dr. Funk, along with a variety of Tiki drinks.

The Funkmaster Flex was born of hip-hop.  At the dawn of the 21st. Century I was working once a week in a bar in one of Boston’s outer reaches.

(This tavern is no longer in existence)

A gentleman stepped to the bar and asked for a “hip-hop” drink.

Nice or nasty? “, I asked.

Nice AND nasty,” he replied.

Hmph.

When I was asked for a “nice” hip-hop drink the Henne Russian was my go-to.  2 parts Hennessy, 1 part Kahlua and a splash of milk.  On the rocks for clubs, which rarely permit glassware at hip-hop events much less stemware, and as a martini in more genteel environments.  The Henne Russian is a remixed version of the Brandy Alexander with the Hennessy lending the cache’ of hip-hop and Kahlua standing in for the brown Creme de Cacao of  the 1940’s classic.  (The Brandy Alexander’s classic version featured half-and-half which is too thick for modern mouths).

When “nasty” was requested my mix was the Beat Box, 2 parts Hennessy to 1 part Peppermint Schnapps.  The Beat box was a remix with a quickness of the classic Stinger again up-scaling from brandy to Hennessy and replacing white Creme de Menthe with Peppermint Schnapps.

A burn to the tip of the tongue with a long, sweet swallow to follow.

As detailed in my recipes for the Floratini and Metropolitan gender is a primary factor in cocktail preference.  Most men, with a few significant exceptions like burn.  Most women, with a few significance exceptions, like sweetness.  This determines the flavor profile of the drink.

Nice AND nasty!”

Hmph.

Bartending can accelerate the brain without resort to coffee or Red Bull  as your reputation and your employer’s reputation is hanging on every drop.

Funk is the root of hip-hop.  James Brown’s epochal “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag,” featured the baritone sax of Maceo Parker as the hook playing tag with the staccato guitar of Jimmy Nolen, ushering in an era.  Beginning with James’ throaty “Papa…” the chorus, verse, chorus, verse bridge structure reversed the constraints of pop and served notice that rhythm ruled.  The seminal funk of James Brown gestated into the Sugarhill Gang’s 1979 “Rapper’s Delight” and music would never be the same.

Nice AND nasty,” the guest repeated.

Hmph.

From the CD jukebox in the corner the Jay-Z/Jermaine Dupri hit “Money Ain’t a Thang” blared in all of its materialistic majesty.

“…bubble hard in my Double R…new whips…money ain’t a thang”, Jay-Z’s authoritative flow gave words to the cover art of HARD KNOCK LIFE PART II bringing car culture to the beat.

Nice AND nasty!”

My brain is in cocktail overdrive and all I can think about is cars!  (Disclosure: I don’t even have a driver’s license).  And then an idea made its way into one of unused sections of my cerebellum.  YO! MTV RAPS had begun featuring a segment featuring NY’s HOT 97 personality Funkmaster Flex displaying “tricked out whips”.  “Whips” are mentioned prominently in the Jay-Z/Jermaine Dupri jam “Money Ain’t a Thang” jam playing on the jukebox at that very instant.

So I took a chance that the gentleman knew who Funkmaster Flex was and declared:

“I’ll make you a Funkmaster Flex,” I said and began the mental process of remixology.

Cocktail knowledge is based on basing drinks on other drinks so I knew that Dr. Funk’s remix into Funkmaster Flex would stay in mind.

To make the drink “hip-hop” I substituted Hennessy for Myer’s rum.  The tavern I was working at did not carry Pernod which is just as well as the chartreuse coloration of Pernod French anise would detract from the Funkmaster Flex’s visual appeal.  I substituted Sambuca which is clear and offered the virtue of being hotter/nastier than Pernod.

As of late drinks have been served in ever larger glasses and seeing as how the tavern did not offer martini glasses, we were in the outer reach of Boston, I made the drink in an iced 16 oz. acrylic glass.  This necessitated using sour mix, O.J. and pineapple juice to create visual value and make it “nice“.  2 drops of grenadine gives the impression of added value and casts the cocktail in a lovely color that calls to mind Tropicana’s Ruby Red Grapefruit Juice.

“Here is your Funkmaster Flex!”

“Yo, this is nice AND nasty!”

Thus the Funkmaster Flex was born and it has been a player in my cocktail repertoire since back in the day.

FUNKMASTER FLEX

1.5 oz. Hennessy

3/4 oz. Sambuca

1 oz. sour mix

1 oz. O.J.

1 oz. Pineapple juice

2 dots grenadine

Fill a martini glass with ice water.

Fill a 24 oz. shaker with ice.

Pour all ingredients into the shaker and top shaker with mixing glass.

Shake until the frost line climbs to the top of the mixing glass.

dispose of ice water in martini glass.

Break shaker and mixing glass into martini glass.

Garnish with lemon flag.

REMIXOLOGY: REINVENTING CLASSIC COCKTAILS FOR MODERN MOUTHS

https://stevegallanter.wordpress.com

stevegallanter@yahoo.com

Oh yeah, feel free to rename this concoction. (“Nice and Nasty” would almost certainly fit the bill).  As always position the glass under the bar spots for maximum visual appeal.

REMIXOLOGY, DRINK, HOSPITALITY: The FLORATINI a/k/a The Bronx

June 11, 2013 2 comments

The Floratini was originally The Bronx.  The Bronx is perhaps the 1st. cocktail I discovered through research.

My usual tactic for a woman asking if I have a specialty drink is to ask “Nice or nasty?”

My experience has been that most women want “nice”, which is to say sweet.  As this blog attest the Birthday drink for Women/Erica/Pink Squirrel and the Birthday Drink for Women/Kelly/Girl Scout Cookie had already filled this market niche.

Contrarian impulses do reach the liver upon special occasions. When a women asked for “nasty” I would make a cognac based drink which all too often proved to be a little much.  Indeed when a female guest spied the Hennessy bottle in my hand she would protest a bit  and thus was less than satisfied.

Although cognac is an expanding category in mixed drinks it still scares off some female drinkers.  However,  women asked for “nasty” often enough that I had to have a potion in my repertoire to serve this need.

Thus was born the Floratini.

“Classic cocktails” was Googled and The Bronx was uncovered.  Reputedly invented at the Manhattan Waldorf-Astoria in 1905 by barkeep Johnny Solon it was a variation of the Duplex; a 50/50 blend of sweet and dry vermouth with a drop of orange bitters.

However The Bronx is more closely aligned with the Orange Blossom; gin and orange juice, and remixed into the martini I remixed into the Floratini.

The technology of 1905 made squeezing fresh oranges a necessity and not a nod to freshness as refrigeration was primitive and expensive.

Following the economic and technological leap of the post WWI era  refrigeration became commonplace in the finer restaurants of the Roaring 20’s.

Following the economic and technological leap of the post-WWII era home refrigeration became commonplace.

Indeed, consuming citrus juice on a daily basis was one of the hallmarks of the emergent suburban culture.

Juice drinks gained their cachet and widespread popularity during this time.

Remixology reinvents classic cocktails for modern mouths thus the Floratini as the orange juice becomes “Florida,” which also reminds me of a friend who described Miami as “the Bronx with palm trees!”

The Floratini

2 oz. gin

3/4 oz. sweet vermouth

1/4 oz. dry vermouth

1.5 oz. orange juice

Fill a martini glass with ice water.

Fill a 24 oz. shaker with ice.

Pour all ingredients EXCEPT dry vermouth into the shaker.

Top shaker with mixing glass and shake vigorously until the frost line climbs to the top of the shaker.

Dispose of ice water and rim martini glass with sugar.

Break contents of shaker into martini glass.

Pour just a tad of dry vermouth into the Floratini with great ceremony.

Tips for shaking:  Hold the shaker in your “off” hand with the mixing glass on top.  This creates visual appeal and adds subtle showmanship to your drink as savvy guests realize you are ambidextrous.

On a more functional note the tricky part of break pouring is using the mixing glass to filter the ice fragments and this is best accomplished with your dominant hand.

The addition of the dry vermouth at the end of the creation of the cocktail is mostly for show.  Gazing lovingly at the libation before administering the final touch adds to the entertainment value for the guest.

Crucial to the presentation of the Floratini is color.  The sweet vermouth’s maroon color darkens the orange juice a shade.  The color to be painted is about that of Tropicana’s Ruby Red Grapefruit Juice.

To maximize the visual appeal place the drink directly under the spot lights that hang above many bars.

The Floratini tastes good!  Women who crave a little bite will get a sting of gin softened by the sweetness of orange juice.  The viscosity of the sweet vermouth gives a nice mouth feel that amplifies the flavor profile.

Remixology: The reinvention of classic cocktails for modern mouths.

Cheers!

DRINK, HOSPITALITY Happy Birthday Drink for a Woman/Pink Squirrel

February 28, 2013 Leave a comment

HAPPY BIRTHDAY DRINK FOR A WOMAN

Occasionally while tending bar a woman will ask if I have a specialty drink.

“What’s your name?”

“Erica”.

“I’ll make you an Erica.”

“ERICA”

1 1/2  oz. DiSarrono Originale

3/4 oz White Creme de Cacao

2 oz Milk

2 dots Grenadine

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker filled 1/2 with ice.

Shake vigorously until the frost line climbs to the top of the shaker.

Break and pour into a martini glass.

Garnish with a cherry pierced by a swizzle stick across the top of the gl;ass.

The color should be that of the Pink Panther cartoon

(Dirty joke optional).

In matter of strict fact this is a variation of the Pink Squirrel.  The classic Pink Squirrel was made with Creme de Noyeaux a pecan based liqueur.  (Southern Comfort is a pecan-based liqueur).

The amaretto provides the “nut” for the squirrel to mix a metaphor as well as a cocktail.

Amarettto became popular in the United States following WWII as Italian-Americans’ upward mpobility lead to restaurant ownership.  In 2001 Amaretto DiSarrono began marketing itself as DiSarrono Originale .

This cocktail is sweet and pink. For the best visual effect try to position it underneath a pinspot to highlight the soft pinkness of the alcoholic confection and maximize the gratuity potential.

In many instances this drink is ordered by the boyfriend/date/some guy for his girlfriend/date/whatever in order to ingratiate himself with the woman who will be drinking it.  Girls nights out are also a window of sales opportunity.

My experience is that every guest will enjoy  a drink named for them.

Cheers!

Categories: DRINK, HOSPITALITY Tags: ,