Home > Uncategorized > The History of the Society for American Baseball Research, By Steve Gallanter

The History of the Society for American Baseball Research, By Steve Gallanter

A lifelong New York Mets fan and lover of the game, Steve Gallanter has also belonged to the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) for a number of years.

Growing up in Port Washington, New York, and currently living in Boston, Steve Gallanter has also adopted the Red Sox as his team because of a strong dislike for the New York Yankees.

Tracing its beginnings to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, SABR started out as a gathering of 16 accomplished baseball researchers, among them L. Robert Davids, who organized the meeting. That 1971 meeting spawned the SABR, and one decade later, the organization numbered some 1,500 members. Today, more than 6,000 people worldwide participate in the SABR. Members run the gamut from major and minor league officials and former players to broadcast professionals and writers. However, the majority is comprised of diehard fans of the sport. Not only do members share their love of baseball and the history of the game at yearly conventions and regional chapter meetings, they receive access to leading resources, such as the Baseball Research Journal, as well as news websites and reports dedicated to the sport. To learn more about the society, visit www.sabr.org.

Steven Gallanter’s baseball blogs can be found at baseball-fever.com.  Go to ‘Blogs’ and then enter ‘Steven Gallanter’ into the ‘Search’ function.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: